Our last underway replenishment was an astern refueling with a minesweeper from the US Navy

Our last underway replenishment was an astern refueling with a minesweeper from the US Navy

Our underway replenishment with the Yukon while underway.

Our underway replenishment with the Yukon while underway.

This is an underway replenishment we did with our sister ship and this is her approach to starboard

Finally we went back out to sea this last monday. this is the picture that i got as we were turning out of our slip in port and had San Diego dead ahead of us.

Finally we went back out to sea this last monday. this is the picture that i got as we were turning out of our slip in port and had San Diego dead ahead of us.

We got together with 5 of the 6 students currently in San Diego and a spattering of Webb alumni for a few snacks and drinks.

The USNS Henry J Kaiser from the pier at North Island Air Station/Coronado Naval Base

The USNS Henry J Kaiser from the pier at North Island Air Station/Coronado Naval Base

The USNS Henry J Kaiser from the pier at North Island Air Station/Coronado Naval Base

The USNS Henry J Kaiser from the pier at North Island Air Station/Coronado Naval Base

Our sister ship leaving the harbor from right behind us

Dave Smith ‘14 hard at work welding.

Dave Smith ‘14 hard at work welding.

This is what we both end up doing every night while we are out here. Just sitting on our computers once we are about to go to sleep. =]

This is what we both end up doing every night while we are out here. Just sitting on our computers once we are about to go to sleep. =]

Our Sea Time Up Till Now

This is a photo of the USNS Yukon, one of our sister ships, docked behind us just before sunset.

So far, this entire experience has been quite amazing, and I have thoroughly enjoyed it. The sheer amount of things we were exposed to in the first week was amazing. Anything and everything from helping to install and rewire new parts, to cleaning under the equipment, to wallowing around in fuel leaks, to yesterday, when we began to tear apart one of the diesel generators to fix the jacket water pump.

From everything that we have done from day to day, we have begun to understand everything that is on our ship. Specifically the USNS Kaiser has some very interesting propulsion machinery. We run off of two 10 cylinder diesel engines, which also provide the main power for the house and the operations of the ship. When we are getting ready to offload fuel to another ship while underway (we are a tanker that works with the US navy) we have to bring the two 18 cylinder diesel generators online to handle the load of the cargo operations only. Also, if one of the main engines were to fail, we could drive the propeller that it was attached to through an electrical motor powered by the diesel engines. When using only the diesel generators we can make up to 6 knots. I personally thought that was a really awesome way of doing things.

The only thing that is a bit saddening about this winter work is that we wont be going to sea much. In January we went out for a 5 day period, during which I was able to see the stars with not a single drop of light pollution (gorgeous view). During that time we refueled a destroyer and took on fuel from another of the T-AO (our class) of ship. Unfortunately we are only going out one more time for a single day in the middle of February. But it should be interesting when we go out again. The first time we went out, both Henry and I got to work on the deck with the crews handling the lines and the fuel hoses.

For the most part we have been hanging around in Coronado, and are about an hour by walking and a ferry ride from San Diego, which we have been to on our own twice. The Gaslamp district is quite interesting and fun. But around the area there is still a lot to do. We went sailing with the second mate a couple weeks ago and got to see the Nascco Shipyards from the water, which was quite interesting. We have gone into downtown Coronado a couple times for dinner, and there is a free movie theater on the base.

On Friday, we went to John Malone’s house for a get together with the other webbies in the area. The attendees were Henry and myself, Nolan, Brian, BJ, and Roxy. Unfortunately Sean couldn’t make it, but we had a blast. It was quite nice to just meet up with people we know and hang out for a night. I didn’t take any photos unfortunately, it just didn’t cross my mind at the time.

Well, that’s all for now i think.

Saying Good Night from Coronado,
Eric Harris

Starbucks was closed for the holiday, so eric and i are standing outside the front door for internet access.

Henry Jansen ‘14 on January 16, 2012.

USNS Henry J. Kaiser  • Length: 677 feet, 6 inches• Beam: 97 feet, 6 inches• Draft: 35 feet• Displacement: 42,763 long tons• Speed: 20.0 knots• Government-Owned/Chartered:Government-owned

USNS Henry J. Kaiser  • Length: 677 feet, 6 inches• Beam: 97 feet, 6 inches• Draft: 35 feet• Displacement: 42,763 long tons• Speed: 20.0 knots• Government-Owned/
Chartered:Government-owned

What does MSC stand for:
Military Sealift Command (MSC) operates approximately 110 noncombatant, civilian-crewed ships that replenish U.S. Navy ships, conduct specialized missions, strategically preposition combat cargo at sea around the world and move military cargo and supplies used by deployed U.S. forces and coalition partners.
What does MSC stand for:
Military Sealift Command (MSC) operates approximately 110 noncombatant, civilian-crewed ships that replenish U.S. Navy ships, conduct specialized missions, strategically preposition combat cargo at sea around the world and move military cargo and supplies used by deployed U.S. forces and coalition partners.